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33HOPS, IT Consultants
33HOPS ::: Proveedores de Soluciones Informáticas :: Madrid :+34 91 663 6085Avda. Castilla la Mancha, 95 - local posterior - 28700 S.S. de los Reyes - MADRID33HOPS, Sistemas de Informacion y Redes, S.L.Info

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Some real life figures and examples on (c)XSITools

Below you can see one of our (c)XSITools backup repositories. Here we keep a set of 5 VMs which sum up 214 GB of real data on 346 GB thin disks.

We are using a 50MB block size combined with LZOP compression, hosting 26675 blocks at an approximate compression rate of 49%, which yields 674 GB of real data on disk.



The expanded backup set would use 7.2 TB of real data on 11.7 TB of thin disks. So we are achieving a compression ratio of 91% with 34 individual restore points for every single Virtual Machine.



Set of 5 VMs being backed up with (c)XSITools



The criticism from anybody sitting on the established paradigm would be to say: "50M is a huge block size, you aren't going to achieve any benefit from de-duplicating on that size, and: what about alignment?, what if some chunk of data moves in regards to the start offset?"

The thing is that the proposed scenario has some particular characteristics: we are backing up virtual disks, which correspond day by day to the same set of Virtual Machines, thus the data in the disks remains mostly aligned from one backup cycle to the next. May some block move in the disk, we'll assume it as part of the game.

The results are well above 90% compression ratio as data grows over a 1 month period. What could we achieve if we used some smaller size deduplication software, maybe 96%?. Now the question is:

Are you willing to sacrifice some 5-6% compression efficiency if in return you get a more fluid type of backup that does not clog your server's CPU and RAM as the backup is unfolding?

If your answer to the above question is yes, you came to the right place.

Given that all backup operations are performed from the ESXi shell, partially using a single core with a minimum amount of RAM and at more than extremely decent speeds, you could say that (c)XSIBackup-Pro is your best bet if you are ready to make the job in the most efficient way.

Of course, you can always use multi-gigabyte software, depending on a number of third party commercial programs that perform the same task with worse figures.

If you have plenty of spare time and don't care much about your data, there's always somebody offering you a way to cross the river to get water.

Daniel J. García Fidalgo
33HOPS
This page was las modified on 2019-05-28



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